Series Compensation Project

A set of innovation projects on the 400 kV network as part of the ongoing transmission network reinforcement to improve power transfer capability between the south west and east coast of Ireland.

Background

EirGrid is progressing a set of innovation projects on the 400 kV network called The Series Compensation Projects. As part of the ongoing transmission network reinforcement to improve power transfer capability between the south west and east coast of Ireland, series compensation is required to be installed in three different locations;

At Dunstown substation in Co. Kildare;
Between Laois and Moneypoint in Co. Clare, and;
Between Oldstreet in Co. Galway to Woodland in Co. Meath.

The Series Compensation Projects are part of the Regional Solution which replaced Grid Link. Other projects in the Regional Solution include the Cross Shannon 400 kV Project and a number of upgrades to the network in the south eastern region.

Why is this project needed?

Approximately 1720 MW of renewable generation is due to be connected to the transmission and distribution systems in the South West of Ireland in the coming years. At times of high wind generation output, it is expected that wind generation will displace conventional generation (Coal, Peat, Gas - Fossil Fuels).

Much of the existing conventional generation on the system is located close to the large load centres, with a concentration on the east coast. The wind generation is, by contrast, largely located on the west coast, remote from the large load centres. Because of this, at times of high wind, large bulk power flows are expected to flow from the south west towards the large load centres on the east coast. System reinforcements are required to facilitate these west-to-east power flows.

Is Series Compensation equipment a new technology?

Series compensation is a new technology in respect of the all-island electricity grid in Ireland and Northern Ireland but is a widely used technology the world.  Advancements in this technology have enabled greater flexibility and more benefits when used on smaller transmission networks, such as the grid in Ireland.